Frequently Asked Questions

How shall I judge what level of funding to apply for? What if I ask for an amount that is judged to be too much?

What is a constituted group?

What is a partnership agreement?

What is meant by ‘benefits to Wales’?

Can you clarify what types of costs can be funded?

What don’t you fund?

How can I demonstrate my application is good value for money?

What is an in-kind cost and how do we calculate it?

What is match funding?

What is a direct and indirect beneficiary?

What is meant by ‘acting inclusively’ (in the up to £5k and up to £15k application forms) and what do we need to explain?

Do I need to complete the risk assessment section if my project has no particular risks?

What are the Sustainable Development Goals and the Well-being of Future Generations Act (Wales) and how do I show that my project supports their delivery or achievement?

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How shall I judge what level of funding to apply for? What if I ask for an amount that is judged to be too much?

There are 3 levels of funding that you can apply for:
• Up to £1,000
• Between £1,001 - £5,000
• Between £5001 - £15,000

The following rules apply to all 3 levels of funding:
• as an individual, you cannot apply for funding over £1,000,
• for activities that take place only in Wales, you cannot apply for more than £5,000, and
• applications for between £5,001 - £15,000 must have impact in both Africa and Wales.

In general we encourage you to consider the current size of your organisational income, and the largest grants you have handled successfully (from the Wales for Africa programme or other funders) before. If you have never previously received a grant and your annual income is less than £5,000, it would be wiser to ask for a small grant in the first instance, not £14,000. Grant funders generally want to see that that you are building up step-by-step before offering larger grants.

Also please look at the grant application forms and assessment criteria at each level. For the smaller grants, less information and detail is required. For the larger grants you will be expected to demonstrate more fully the need for the activity, and that you are working with local partners in the delivery of the grant.

If you apply in one category (e.g. £5,001 - £15,000 category) and the grants panel decides to offer you funding but in a lower category level (e.g. £1,001 - £5,000), we will come back to you to discuss and negotiate. It is a good idea to consider if you could still undertake some of your proposed activities with a smaller grant than you requested, and be ready to discuss this if necessary. In this case, following discussion with you, we would need you to resubmit your budget and project activity plan.

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What is a constituted group?

A constituted group has a written agreement of what that group is going to do and how they will do it. This document will have been agreed by a committee, including a chair, treasurer and secretary as a minimum.

A constitutional document could be a governing document (if you are a registered charity), an MOU (for instance with a NHS health board or Trust), or a steering group Terms of Reference.

Guidance on what your constitution should contain can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/how-to-write-your-charitys-governing-document

To apply for a grant of over £1000 your constituted group must have a bank account with two unrelated signatories.

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What is a partnership agreement? 

When working collaboratively with others, it is essential you collectively write a partnership agreement or a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) which is then signed and dated by representatives from each of the organisations involved.


Many Wales Africa groups have told us how the process of writing the partnership agreement was as important as the document itself in providing clarity and focus, and it is common practice in community development and contracting work.


The purpose of the agreement is to provide a common reference point on joint activities and helps avoid misunderstandings. It outlines roles and responsibilities, individual organisational aims, as well as the joint project’s aims and activities. It is worthwhile highlighting the benefits to each partner of the collaboration; identifying how long the collaboration will last; and how the collaboration can be dissolved.


It is worth having a section on communications between your organisations (key contacts, communications method, frequency and responsiveness) and to the public (how to refer to your funders appropriately). Decision making and dispute resolution should also feature in this section.


Financial management needs to be articulated too, to ensure clear accountability for your trustees. For example, how money will be managed and who is responsible for what in regards to raising funds and over-seeing expenditure.


A basic example of what an MOU or partnership agreement can look like is here.


Further advice has been provide by the National Council of Voluntary Organisations (NCVO) here.

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What is meant by ‘benefits to Wales’?

Each of us in Wales will benefit from and be challenged by our experiences working within this global and local programme. While everyone feels these benefits differently and needs to articulate them in their own words, some of the types of benefits to Wales could include:

• Facilitating volunteering and skills sharing and building relationships which are stimulating and stretching, contributing to overall wellbeing.
• Building confidence to understand how choices taken in Wales have an impact internationally and the capacity to act differently (e.g. buying fair trade, recycling, buying sustainably produced products, local advocacy and outreach etc).
• Generating global awareness through schools talks, photo exhibitions, partner visits; and knowledge of global health conditions which have an impact on domestic diaspora communities;
• Supporting more inclusive classrooms, playgrounds, communities, villages, towns, universities and workplaces and building upon Wales’ heritage as a cohesive and welcoming community.
• Personal development and skills development, contributing to the Welsh economy. For example, creativity in the workplace through adapting to lower resource settings, or providing challenging out of work/secondment experiences which leads to job satisfaction on return.
• Youth engagement as a catalyst for young people in Wales to enhance their employability and aspirations, strengthening Wales’ workforce in a global market.
• Cultural exchange, supporting inclusion and understanding through exposure to communities in Wales and Africa.
• Practice exchange such as sharing solutions and working innovatively in resource poor situations.

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Can you clarify what types of costs can be funded?

We can fund a variety of different activity and operational costs, including, for example:
• booking of stalls for events (e.g. Fair Trade events);
• training and associated costs (e.g. local travel in Africa, venue hire, refreshments);
• communication materials;
• equipment/supplies and infrastructure (where this is an essential part of your activities);
• flights (whether international or domestic) and transport in Wales;
• visas;
• insurance;
• staff salaries or associated costs (for the running costs of the organisations involved);
• office and utility costs (for the running costs of organisations involved).
However, we will be looking for budget costings that show good value for money, awareness of sustainability issues, and match/in-kind contributions wherever possible.

We also fund scoping visits to support organisations in Wales to develop their working relationship with partners in Africa. Applications solely focused upon a scoping visit are generally only funded up to £1,000, although this is not a hard and fast rule.

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What don’t you fund?

We do not fund:
• the costs or expenses of any organisations involved (e.g. international NGOs) that are based outside Wales or Africa;
• training courses for individuals (in Wales or Africa) where this is not an integral part of a wider project/programme;
• academic research;
• unrestricted donations to southern partners;
• school trips/travel;
• humanitarian (emergency relief) operations;
• direct applications from Southern-based organisations;
• evangelical or proselytising activities;
• for-profit activities (exceptions may be made in the case of community cooperatives or microfinance initiatives within a livelihoods programme);
• political parties;
• activities that aim to deny equal rights.

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How can I demonstrate my application is good value for money?

When considering whether your project is good value for money, lots of factors need to be considered and weighed up against each other. There’s no single rule, but rather it is about the balance of what is most pertinent to your project. For example, some things you might want to consider when compiling your budget are the rationale for:
• Travel and accommodation costs – are they reasonable and proportionate, without unnecessary flights?
• Can you demonstrate significant in-kind or match funding?
• Is the purchase of equipment appropriate? Could it be purchased in country, to avoid costly delays, issues with customs as well as supporting local markets?
• Do the staff and volunteers have the appropriate skills and qualities to support the project’s success and build relationships with your partner?
• Are you requesting unreasonable consultancy fees or staff costs?
• Will your project have a positive impact?
• If your costs seem high to you, can you explain why? Is it because you are working with a particularly remote or hard-to-reach group? Consider how this can be demonstrated within the form so that when the budget is considered the costs are understandable.

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What is an in-kind cost and how do we calculate it?

An in-kind cost is a contribution in the form of goods or services rather than cash. These can be quantified and given a financial value which can be added to your budget.

In-kind costs can be the un-paid volunteer time people give in delivering the project, or a service offered for free, such as printing for a local event or free radio advertising.

Some of the costs which could be included are:
• Printing (if it can be provided for free)
• Volunteer coordination time (e.g. £10 per hour living wage for volunteer time that contributes directly to the achievement of grant funded activities)
• Professional time given voluntarily (e.g. pro rata salary cost for a midwife providing midwifery training in Africa, or a surgeon providing surgery training in Africa, or a teacher training teachers and running demonstration classes in Africa).

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What is match funding?

We define match funding as any contribution of cash funds to the project that comes from another source. This could include your own organisation’s fundraising activities, a grant from another funder or donated funds from a local business, for example.

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What is a direct and indirect beneficiary?

Direct beneficiaries are the people who are directly targeted or supported by the project. They are the people who have a direct relationship with the project activities, such as the people who deliver and receive training, the children who are assisted in the target school, and the volunteers or staff coordinating the work. You should be able to count these people and say how many are male/female and child/adult. However, we appreciate that you may not know exact numbers and breakdown if the activity is, for example, an event (and you don’t yet know who will come) or involves a community for which you do not have precise data. If this is the case, please provide an estimate based on some average numbers.

Indirect beneficiaries are those who are not directly targeted by the project but may also benefit from it. For example, supporting a group of women (direct beneficiaries) to develop small businesses, is likely to increase the well-being of their children and family (indirect beneficiaries). Improving equipment and training nurses (direct beneficiaries) in a rural health clinic will benefit the patients within the area that the clinic normally serves (also direct beneficiaries). But the project will also likely benefit the wider community around the health centre (indirect beneficiaries) due to better health within the families and community generally, and any patients who may travel from further afield to the clinic (also indirect beneficiaries).

It is usually only possible to make broad estimates of indirect beneficiaries, so feel free to give just a broad estimate and brief description if you choose to fill in that section.

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What is meant by ‘acting inclusively’ (in the up to £5k and up to £15k application forms) and what do we need to explain?

It can be easy for projects to (accidentally or otherwise) exclude certain people or groups from its activities. For example, holding whole community discussions can sometimes exclude women if the community leaders are all male, or if women are not able to attend due to the timing of a gathering, or if it is not culturally acceptable for men and women to discuss certain topics together. If this is relevant to your activity and community, how will you ensure that any community discussions include participation by men and women?

If your activity is led by a local organisation with a clear religious ethos (e.g. Christian), or project events are held on particular church premises, what steps will you take to ensure that people of other denominations/faiths/beliefs are included and do not feel excluded from participating in the activity?

If your activity is something that should be accessible to all of a community, including disabled people, what will you do to make sure they are not excluded, e.g. due to physical, practical issues such as lack of transport?

We expect you to consider these issues and design activities in such a way as to ensure that people (from your relevant target groups) are not excluded from participation. In this section on the application form, explain this thinking and what you will do ensure that your project is inclusive.

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Do I need to complete the risk assessment section if my project has no particular risks?

Yes! Your project doesn’t need to be obviously ‘hazardous’ to have some risks. All projects have some degree and level of risk. For example:

Risks involved in implementing the project:
The people coordinating your activities (in Wales and/or Africa) may become ill or unable to fulfil their role. What would you do if this happened? Are there others in the group/organisation who could take over the project? Could severe weather, political turbulence, conflict or outbreak of disease in Africa potentially interrupt your activities, and if so how might you handle your project in these circumstances? If you intend to hold an event in Wales, is there a risk that very few people come? Do you need to consider timing of the event and in what time of year it takes place? How will you promote/publicise the event or work with other partners to ensure that you achieve good attendance and participation?

Risks to sustainability of the project:
If you are training people to acquire new skills and ways of working, do they have the resources to be able to use their new skills in the future? Will there be any further support to monitor or assist these people following the end of the project funding? If you are funding salary-type payments for delivering a new or additional service, what will happen to these workers when the grant comes to an end? If you are providing important equipment, are there arrangements in place to ensure that it can be maintained and spare parts replaced?

Financial risks to the project:
Is your match funding secure? If not, can you still deliver the project activities or can they be scaled-down appropriately? If your partner NGO in Africa lost its core funding and had to significantly downsize or close in the middle of your project, would there be any alternative way to deliver the project? What would happen if currency fluctuations or rises in costs meant a significant increase in key project activities? How would you handle this?

Overseas travel risks:
There are obvious risks relating to overseas travel, so we want your reassurance that anyone travelling to Africa from the UK will have adequate travel and medical insurance. We will not fund travel to countries or areas where the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office advises against all travel, or all but essential travel. If that is currently the case for the area you work in, or you think it could happen within the duration of your project, we would like you to consider whether there are ways of delivering your project without travel from the UK.

It should be possible to identify some of the most likely risks to your project under each heading, and we will consider it a strength to the application if you do. We understand that it is not always possible to mitigate against some risks, and if they occur, part or all of the project may have to stop. However, if you receive a grant we would work with you to explore the potential for varying the project or delivering alternative, similar activities with the funding instead.

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What are the Sustainable Development Goals and the Well-being of Future Generations Act (Wales) and how do I show that my project supports their delivery or achievement?

Sustainable Development Goals
The Goals are part of a United Nations “plan of action for people, planet and prosperity”. They were adopted by all UN Member States in September 2015 in the document Transforming our World: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.
The plan is a successor to the Millennium Development Goals which lasted until 2015. The Goals are to be achieved by 2030. There are 17 goals and 169 targets underneath them.

The preamble to the document declares: “We resolve, between now and 2030, to end poverty and hunger everywhere; to combat inequalities within and among countries; to build peaceful, just and inclusive societies; to protect human rights and promote gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls; and to ensure the lasting protection of the planet and its natural resources. We resolve also to create conditions for sustainable, inclusive and sustained economic growth, shared prosperity and decent work for all, taking into account different levels of national development and capacities.”

The goals in a nutshell
1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition, and promote sustainable agriculture
3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote life-long learning opportunities for all
5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable, and modern energy for all
8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
10. Reduce inequality within and among countries
11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

We ask you to demonstrate (for any funding over £1,000) how your project is going to support the delivery of the SDGs. To do that, we recommend that you highlight those goals which are immediately relevant to your project activities and write a brief paragraph explaining how your project will contribute. More information on the Sustainable Development Goals can be found here

Well-being of Future Generations Act (Wales) 2015
The Well-being of Future Generations Act was passed by the National Assembly for Wales in 2015. The Act aims to make the UN Sustainable Development Goals real within a Welsh context.

The Act places a duty on many Welsh Government funded bodies including health and fire services and local authorities (and on the Welsh Government itself) to “carry out sustainable development” and to take action to achieve the following seven well-being goals:
1. A prosperous Wales: An innovative, productive and low carbon society which recognises the limits of the global environment and therefore uses resources efficiently and proportionately (including acting on climate change); and which develops a skilled and well-educated population in an economy which generates wealth and provides employment opportunities, allowing people to take advantage of the wealth generated through securing decent work.
2. A resilient Wales: A nation which maintains and enhances a biodiverse natural environment with healthy functioning ecosystems that support social, economic and ecological resilience and the capacity to adapt to change (for example climate change).
3. A healthier Wales: A society in which people’s physical and mental well-being is maximised and in which choices and behaviours that benefit future health are understood.
4. A more equal Wales: A society that enables people to fulfil their potential no matter what their background or circumstances (including their socio economic background and circumstances).
5. A Wales of cohesive communities: Attractive, viable, safe and well-connected communities.
6. A Wales of vibrant culture and thriving Welsh language: A society that promotes and protects culture, heritage and the Welsh language, and which encourages people to participate in the arts, and sports and recreation.
7. A globally responsible Wales: A nation which, when doing anything to improve the economic, social, environmental and cultural well-being of Wales, takes account of whether doing such a thing may make a positive contribution to global well-being.

We ask you to demonstrate (for any funding over £1,000) how your project is going to contribute to the achieving the Well-being of Future Generations Act. To do that, we recommend that you highlight those goals which are immediately relevant to your project activities and write a brief paragraph explaining how your project will contribute. More information on the Well-Being of Future Generations Act can be found here – just skip to the factsheet for the goal most relevant to you.

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